Questions to ask when scheduling an appointment for your child’s hearing test

  1. How long is the wait for an appointment? [LEARN MORE]
  2. What information do I need to bring with me to the appointment? [LEARN MORE]
  3. Will more than one appointment be needed to complete the testing? [LEARN MORE]
  4. How do I need to prepare my child for the appointment? [LEARN MORE]
  5. Does your facility accept my insurance plan? If not, are there other funding resources available? [LEARN MORE]
  6. How often do you see children the same age of my child? [LEARN MORE]
  7. If you will need an interpreter during the appointment, please be sure to ask.
  8. Can I bring a friend/family member with me to the appointment to help me better understand test results and next steps?
  9. Do I have to pay for parking? If yes, how much? Are there other things I should know about parking at your center?
  10. Are there other fees/costs that I need to be prepared for at the time of the appointment?
  11. Is there any paperwork that I can fill out prior to my visit?

Keep in mind:
  • A hearing test should be completed before 3 months of age if your child does not pass the hospital hearing screening.
  • It is important to diagnose hearing loss as soon as possible so your child does not miss out on early learning and language development opportunities.
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Keep in mind:
  • It is helpful to bring all hearing screening results.
  • Testing should be performed on both ears, even if one ear passed the screening.
  • Some babies are at a higher risk for hearing loss than others. It is helpful to provide information about pregnancy or childbirth problems and any family history of childhood hearing loss.
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Keep in mind:
  • If more than one appointment is going to be needed, be sure to ask how long the wait is for the next appointment.
  • It could take up to 2 hours to complete a hearing evaluation. All testing may not be completed in one visit.
  • If another appointment is needed, it is important to make the second appointment as soon as possible so that treatment is not delayed.
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Keep in mind:
  • It is important to prepare for the appointment so your child will be ready for testing.
  • Preparation depends on how the test is done and the age of your child.
  • For newborns and very young infants, the testing is done while your baby is sleeping.
  • For older babies, sedation may be recommended.
  • Children who are old enough to cooperate for testing should be well-rested, relaxed, and ready to play.
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Keep in mind:
  • You may need a referral from your child’s doctor for the hearing test to be covered by your insurance.
  • Medicaid is government-funded health care for low-income children and families.
  • Private health plans are health insurance plans offered by employers to their employees. An individual can also purchase a private plan.
  • The Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA 2004) provides federal funding (supplemented by state funds) for school-based services for all children ages 3–21 years who qualify to receive services.
  • Children younger than 3 may qualify for your state Early Intervention (Part C) program.
  • Some programs are based on financial need; these can assist with costs related to audiology services, hearing aids, assistive devices, and speech-language pathology services.
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Keep in mind:
  • Experience does matter, but smaller facilities with fewer patients often provide excellent services.
  • Top quality facilities can be found in both urban AND rural areas.
  • Think about the types of services the facility offers and how they can best meet the needs of your child and family.
  • Talk to parents about their experiences with different facilities.
  • You may also want to seek a second opinion from another facility.
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